Conference Agenda

2017 Conference Agenda:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM  Pre – Conference: 2017 Buprenorphine Advanced Training and Office Based Opioid Treatment
Presenteres: Anthony Dekker, DO & Monica Faria, MD
(SEPARATE REGISTRATION FEE)
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SATUDAY, NOVEMBER 18
7:00 AM    Registration & Breakfast
8:00 AM    Welcome – Monica Faria, MD, AzSAM Board President
8:15 AM    Physicians with substance use disorder: Can this model be effectively applied to other populations? -Paul H. Earley, MD, DFASAM
9:15 AM     Taking Action on Arizona’s Opioid Crisis – Sheila Sjolander, MSW
10:00 AM   Break
10:15 AM    The Health of Healthcare Providers: Current Data, Treatment, and Resources for Professional Support – Matt Goldenber, DO: Michel Sucher, MD, FASAM, FACEP; John Shufeldt, MD, JD, MBA, FACEP
12:30 PM   Lunch
1:30 PM     Is it About the Money? – Renee Siegel
2:15 PM     The Opioid Crisis: Reframing How We Discuss Addiction as a Disease and Other Observations – Simon Olstein, MD, FASAM, FACS, RYT & Craig Rosenstein
3:15 PM     Break
3:30 PM     Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment in 2017 – Michael Dekker, DO
4:15 PM     Street, Scripts and Synthetic: Addictive and Deadly -Stephanie Siete, Community Bridges
5:00 PM     Closing remarks – Monica Faria, MD, AzSAM Board President

Session Descriptions:

(In order of the agenda)  Speaker Information

8:15 AM  Physicians with substance use disorder: Can this model be effectively applied to other populations? – Paul Earley MD, DFASAM

Physician Health Programs (PHPs) use multi-year, use contingency-driven, chronic disease management protocols to care for physicians with SUDs.[1, 2] Remarkable recovery rates and increased patient safety comes from drug and alcohol screening, mandatory support and therapy attendance and swift and sure responses to concerning behaviors.[3] Changing a brain-driven illness such as addiction can only occur by shaping attitudes, beliefs and behaviors.[4]

Since their inception, PHPs have been the subject of extensive outcome research which has shown impressive results.[5-12] Good outcomes transfer to other cohorts such as airline pilots,[13] DUI-offenders[14] and probationers.[15] Several authors have suggested that the important elements of such programs can be extracted, building a generalizable model for the long-term management of the chronic disease of addiction.[16-19]

This lecture start by describing PHPs and how they produce impressive outcomes and, at the same time, increase safety for family, co-workers and patients. It will then describe the core elements of these programs, describing how they can be modified for different patient populations. We will consider this long-term system, buttressed by case management using drug screening, coordination of care with outside providers and a robust data management system as a possible model for all who suffer from this complex illness.

9:15 AM  Taking Action on Arizona’s Opioid Crisis – Sheila Sjolander, MSW

In 2016, Arizona experienced a startling increase in opioid deaths, triggering Governor Doug Ducey to declare a public health emergency for opioid overdoses.  With the Arizona Department of Health Services leading the charge, the emergency declaration set in motion substantial action to curb the opioid epidemic.   Learn about the most recent data, response activities, and the work of the Goal Council Opioid Breakthrough Project.

Learning Objectives:

•  Understand what Arizona data indicates about the opioid epidemic
•  Learn what actions have been taken by the Arizona Department of Health Services to reduce opioid deaths in the state

10:15 AM  Panel Discussion:The Health of Healthcare Providers: Current Data, Treatment, and Resources for Professional Support  – Matt Goldenberg, DO; Michel Sucher, MD; John Shufeldt

This course will focus on the current state of our healthcare provider workforce. Topics range from Suicide and Substance Abuse to Burnout. A focus is placed on risk factors, including the role of relying on self-treatment by physicians and other healthcare providers. The speakers will address signs and symptoms that precede a referral to an evaluation, treatment, and/or professional supportive practices such as physician coaching. The Arizona Physician’s Health Program will be discussed in the following terms: history, current services, and future directions. An established local physician coaching practice will be described, including topics pertaining to professional, organizational, and personal development.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the symptoms and signs of burnout, clinical depression and suicidal behavior in healthcare practitioners
  • Understand the role of the Arizona Physician Health Program in rehabilitating the physician workforce
  • Discuss integrative approaches to improve patient outcomes by focusing on physician wellness and professional integrity

1:30 PM     Is it About the Money? – Renee Siegel

The most recent addition of addiction disorders to the new DSM is Gambling Disorder. Although previously in the DSM as pathological gambling under impulse control disorders, the face of disordered gambling is changing.

In this brief presentation, participants will be introduced to some basic information about gambling disorders. We will review the DSM criteria, a chart of disordered gambling and recovery and some important interventions to those impacted by a gambling disorder.

Learning Objectives:

    • Recognize the symptoms and signs of burnout, clinical depression and suicidal behavior in healthcare practitioners
    • Participants will be able to name several of the DSM criteria for a gambling disorders
    • Participants will be able to identify specifics populations at risk and trends.
    • Participants will be able to identify important initial interventions.
    • Participants will be able to administer a basic 2 question assessment for problem gamblers.

     

  • 2:15 PM     The Opioid Crisis: Reframing How We Discuss Addiction as a Disease and Other Observations – Simon Olstein, MD & Craig Rosenstein

    This presentation will discuss how we as clinicians can reframe the way in which we deliver the message that addiction is a chronic medical condition and not a moral failing or a character flaw. We will discuss the fact that even though addiction is a disease, the criminal justice system still has an obvious and important part to play. We will consider some ideas for possible changes that we can make in dealing with our opioid crisis. This will include opportunities at the municipal level and at the state level and in treatment facilities as well as even within the prison system. We will hear about the workings of the legal system and possible initiatives for change from Craig Rosenstein, a local DUI and criminal attorney.

  • Learning objectives:

•  Explain why many people continue to have difficulty in accepting the idea that addiction is a chronic medical condition and not a moral failing or a character flaw.
•  Discuss what we can do to modify our message by acknowledging that many people have been victimized and hurt by somebody with an addiction problem and by validating the pain that many have suffered.
•  Identify ways to decrease the stigma attached to addiction.
Explore the necessary role played by the criminal justice system and ways that we can encourage treatment rather than incarceration

  • 3:30 PM  Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment in 2017 – Michael Dekker, DO

    A brief, yet comprehensive review of all medically accepted treatments for Alcohol Use Disorder in August 2017.

    Learning Objectives:

•  Attendees will learn how to diagnose Alcohol Use Disorder and determine what the first steps of treatment should address.
•  Attendees will be able to identify when to recommend non-pharmacologic treatments: “Detox/rehab” cycle, support group meetings: AA, Smart Recovery, and Al Anon
•  Attendees will learn how to utilize Medication Assisted Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorder
•  Attendees will learn about the relapse cycle, and how to handle this situation appropriately

  • 4:15 PM    Street, Scripts and Synthetic: Addictive and Deadly -Stephanie Siete, Community Bridges

    This class will focus on today’s most abused substances; where they come from, what they look like and how their potent effects are killing individuals and devastating families. Yet, the biggest impact is usually felt on the rest of society… as drug use is not a victimless crime. An in depth discussion on loopholes in the law, lack of knowledge, limited resources and how low public expectations are impacting communities on a larger scale will be addressed.

    Drugs are not just illegal substances abused on the streets. Today designer research chemicals from labs in Southeast Asia exist and here in the US people are attempting to duplicate them in their own backyards. Synthetics are constantly evolving and we are behind in detection and treatment. Even the marijuana of today is chemically altered with butane or disguised in edibles; both new and powerful. We still have our illegal and popular drugs of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and ecstasy but now they are more potent and widespread than ever. Then we have the most dangerous drugs… the legal ones. Prescription drugs, alcohol and the act of smoking and vaping are driving our drug death rates up every year. The US is seeing more people dead from drugs than firearms, falls and car crashes.

    Attend this class for the updates, outcomes and resources. Most importantly, attend to challenge your thinking and take action to change these trends.

    5:00 PM     Closing remarks – Monica Faria, AzSAM Board President